Miami’s Bridges

Everything Else

Ferry located at the “south part of town,” 1880’s

In the beginning, there was the ferry, and the ferry was located south of town, at the “southern edge” of Miami. The ferry preceded the town itself.

“Road workers” at fording spot near NW 3rd, circa 1900

According to resident Mary Booth, born in 1898, there was also a place to ford the river under favorable conditions in the vicinity of NW 3rd. The photo above depicts this location.

Ten years after the town was incorporated (1901), a toll bridge was completed, near the present-day bridge by Riverview Park. This ended the ferry’s run. Note two bridges visible in the photo below.

1913, toll bridge and Frisco bridge in background

The Frisco railroad to Afton was also completed that year, so Miami quickly had two bridges where it had none.

Frisco bridge across the Neosho, early 20th century

This original Frisco bridge was replaced in 1943 with a span which had no trusses. It continues to exist today, although it has had improvements over the years.

In 1916, the toll bridge was purchased by Ottawa county for $10,000, and you could now cross the Neosho south of town for free.

According to The History of Ottawa County, by Velma Nieberding, the bridge was disassembled around 1920-1921 and moved to Steppe’s Ford, west of Commerce. It was demolished there in 2016.

Concrete bridge at Riverview Park, circa 1960

The disassembly of that bridge is the logical time period for the building of the concrete bridge which was there through late 1967. That bridge had arches which were prone to catching driftwood and which had to be frequently cleaned. It was replaced with a higher span with less obstruction in 1967.

In 1934, construction began on a brand new bridge at SW 3rd. On September 22, 1935, it was opened to traffic. That bridge lasted until it was replaced in 1997.

The Route 66 bridge, circa 1940

C.M. Bartlett dedicating the new Highway 66 bridge, 1937

News-Record article and photo describing new Riverview Park bridge, November 1967. Four bridges are temporarily visible.

The concrete bridge depicted above was demolished shortly after the new one opened.

There’s one other bridge spanning the Neosho in Miami.

Building the M,O, and G bridge, 1912

The M O and G bridge, 2011

South of Riverview Park, around the river bend, stands the old M,O and G bridge. Originally built in 1912, it was abandoned some time in the 60’s. At presstime, it still stands.

There is now a concrete bridge at west Steve Owens Boulevard spanning the river. Thus, Miami now has two modern concrete bridges, one old railroad bridge in good repair, and one railroad bridge which has been abandoned.

Steve Gaines, Born in Miami

Everything Else

As of this publishing date, Wikipedia continues to insist that Steve Gaines was born in Seneca, Missouri. The clipping below from the Miami News-Record of September 15, 1949, should remove all doubt. This is the Miami Baptist Hospital admittance announcements. And Steve was born on September 14, 1949, of course. And note that his parents were already living on Circle Drive.

If anyone has the ability to edit the erroneous Wikipedia article, this clipping should provide conclusive proof. It can also be accessed at newspapers.com.

The Anti-Horse Thief Association

Everything Else

In 1914, cars were a rarity. The well-to-do had them, most everyone else had horses. The horse was the sole means of transportation, and to lose it to a thief would mean great inconvenience. The police did what they could do, but many thieves went unapprehended. Thus, in 1914, a vigilante group formed in Miami called the Anti-Horse Thief Association. Incidentally, the first one was formed around 1859 in Ft. Scott, Kansas.

It was a secret society, for good reason: in addition to catching thieves and turning them over to the authorities, they would sometimes dispense their own form of justice, which would typically involve a rope in a tree. Keeping the membership secret would discourage retaliation from the thieves’ friends and family. Plus, if the thieves didn’t know who the members were, they wouldn’t avoid them.

Call for an anti-thief organization to stop thefts of mining equipment, January 16, 1927

As the years went by, the group performed fewer lynchings and became less secret. A May 1930 article in the News-Record gives minutes from a group meeting in Vinita where officers were elected and named. They would post signs on properties advertising rewards of 25 to 50 dollars for the arrest and conviction of thieves of any type of property. By 1947, the national group had changed their name to the Anti-Thief Association.

By the 50’s, the group had faded away nationwide. There are still scattered branches, but they have become social clubs, not vigilante groups. Nowadays, we have Neighborhood Watch programs to keep an eye out for wrongdoers. But step back to Miami’s early years, and there was a similar organization with a lot more teeth.

 

Mrs. Cottam’s First Grade Class, 1965

Everything Else

This set of photos rates its own post, not because of the class picture (which is amazing, IMHO), but because of the bonus on the back: the names of the students! Unfortunately, one name is missing: the girl between Cindy Tam and Kim Kissee. It’s Jamie Swank.

Mrs. Cottam’s first grade class, Nichols Elementary, 1965-66. Click to enlarge

Mrs. Cottam’s first grade class, Nichols Elementary, 1965-66, names of students. Click to enlarge.